A3014 – An O14 Micro Model Railway

Bruce Wood has supplied the following details on his first venture into O14:

My latest model railway – A3014 was an experimental project to see if I could construct a fully operational micro model railway in O14 scale.

The Model Railway name, translated :

– A3 represents the standard A3 footprint size – 42.0 cm x 29.7 cm, and

- 014 –represents the gauge, which is O14

Over the last few years, I had purchased and constructed a number of O14 locos and rolling stock. As I didn’t have any suitable track to operate these models, they were stored away. A3014 has given me the opportunity to operate and showcase these models.

This Model Railway took 12 hours to construct, and everything which was used to construct this model railway came from materials and “left-over” supplies I had stored in my garage. I try and maintain a low budget on my modelling projects, and as all materials were “on-hand”, there was no cost. The baseboard was 7mm ply board from a grate used to transport machine parts from China. The two structures – the railway trestle bridge and the road bridge, were scratch-built using a small size of dressed timber I had purchased from the local hardware store and leftover from another project, and also craft sticks which I always keep a good supply on hand (coffee stirrers and ice cream type sticks in different sizes) purchased at a local Homebase variety store.

I personally do not like “table-top” flat model railways, and even in this relatively small size, I feel I have achieved the illusion of hilly terrain, and I like the scene this creates when I photograph the models.

I am delighted with the end result of this micro model railway, and my entry into operating O14 models. This was a very straightforward and easy and a fun project to build, and has given me immense satisfaction operating and watching my O14 models.

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O14 Wheelpress

David John describes his wheelpress (originally published in 7mm NGA Narrow Lines):

One of the troubles with 014 (some would say the only trouble) is that all wheelsets need to be regauged. There are lots of tools to help you check you have got it right, vernier callipers, Black Dog produced a cast resin block back-to-back gauge, Roy Link/KB Scale produce a very nice etched brass standards gauge. Of even earlier vintage is my home brewed version, simply a piece of 1/16th brass filed to my 12.4mm back to back and then, carefully, bent at right angles to form an ‘L’ shape. All of these will confirm if you have got the spacing correct but do not make the process any easier.

Then along came Adrian Gray, who described his wheelpress. This was over 15 years ago and I cannot remember if this was in a conversation, by e-mail or in print. My press is based on Adrian’s description without me ever seeing it or any drawings or photographs; so it may be exactly the same as Adrian’s – or unrecognisably different. In any case, very many thanks to Adrian – it makes life so much easier!

As the photo shows the wheelpress is made up of three pieces, the two end pieces are essentially the same. Hopefully construction and use are clear from my photos; although the back of the wheel must have all flash cleaned off before pressing. The two fixed slide rods are tool steel, fixed to one end; my press has tell-tales to make sure it is always put together the same way. The middle piece is machined to exactly 12.4 mm (the back to back I use) and the slot is 3mm. If I was doing it again I would include a cross slot to clear gear wheels on driving axles, as per the Black Dog resin block (if I had a cutter big enough!). Apart from those two measurements everything else can be made up from what is to hand.

Each end piece has been drilled and tapped 4BA, this has to be adjusted every time I use a different axle length but, once set, it ensures that the wheels are pressed in the same distance at each side. Nowadays I put a very small drop of thin superglue against the back of the wheel to ensure that it does not move in the future.

The press is simple and quick to use; finger pressure is enough to regauge any wheelset. I usually use 26mm long axles, so have rarely to alter the position of the set screws, although Murphy’s law dictated that the wheelset I picked up for these photographs was on the shorter 24.5mm axle.

Thanks again Adrian.

Wheelpress 1 Wheelpress 2

German Peat Layout

James H has supplied the following details on his new German Peat Layout in O14.

The layout is based on a number of German peat railways that are still in operation across Germany and draws on features from several of them. Much of the research for the layout has been on the excellent http://www.ingr.co.uk/ which is great resource for industrial narrow gauge railways across Europe. I have also purchased an excellent DVD on the subject of the German peat railways.

The layout will be 9 feet by 2 feet and is intended for home use, the base boards will be supplied By Tim Horn, http://www.timhorn.co.uk/baseboards/ these are laser cut baseboard from MDF. Woodwork is my least favourite part of the hobby and I am happy to let someone supply me with premade base boards!

Trackwork will be a mix of KB scale for visible track and copper clad for hidden sidings using Peco code flat bottom rail

I intend to depict 2 scenes on the layout, firstly the unloading scene, this involves the full peat wagons being unloaded into a tipper truck by a tippler and conveyor. The intention is to make a working tippler and conveyor. For the conveyor I have I am in the process of converting a 1/32 toy conveyor by company called Siku. The tippler will need to be scratch built, I intend to use an R/C servo to control it, this will allow the simulation of the tippler being rocked at the top of its movement to dislodge the load.

The second scene will be the ramshackle engine sheds, where basic work on the locos and wagons are stored, along with some maintenance trains.

Work so far has been on the stock for the layout, this has included a Diema DL6 from KB Scale, an O&K from Nonnemintre models and a scratch built Schoma loco of a more modern design built on a Bullant power bogie from Hollywood Foundry.


Rolling stock is mainly peat wagons I have scratch built a couple using KB Scale frames and some large ones using on the KB Scale axle boxes.

The scratch built wagon, the body is from hard word strip and the chassis from styrene sections, the body side is hinged to work with the tippler:


However as I want somewhere in the region of 20-30 of these so I have commissioned a body to be laser cut and 3D printed chassis:

It still needs some work, the frames need to be thinner and the details parts need adding. Again the body is hinged.

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Chelfham at Burton-upon-Trent

We had a good day out with David H’s Chelfham at the 7mm NGA AGM and expo recently. Despite our expectations no wise-cracks about the incomplete state of the trackwork etc. were received and we got lots of seemingly genuine interest. Many old and new friends popped by and several brought O14 locos and stock to run – unfortunately we forgot to photo them all.

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O14 layouts at ExpoNG 2014

ExpoNG poster 2014

ExpoNG 2014 will have more of a focus on O14 modelling than in recent years, with four layouts intended to showcase the variety of narrow gauge themes modellers in our scale are interested in.

Perhaps the most significant will be a section of John Clutterbuck’s Pentewan Light Railway, a home-based layout making a unique exhibition appearance (or at least for this part of it).

Also in attendance will be Rhyd by David John, travelling from the north of Scotland for a rare appearance in the south of the UK, The Abbey Light Railway by David Malton showing a scene from the now sadly closed ALR in Leeds, and South Bierley Sewage Works by Simon Hargraves.

As usual there will also be narrow gauge layouts in all major scales, from the UK and beyond, and excellent support from traders and societies.

ExpoNG 2014 will be held on the 25th October 2014 from 10am to 5pm, at the White Oak Leisure Centre, Hilda May Avenue, Swanley, Kent BR8 7BT

Further details will be available in due course at www.expong.org

Rhyd website

David John has created a website to show details of his excellent layout Rhyd. As he says:

Rhyd’ was built as a home layout and although it was designed to break-down to be transportable it was never intended to be an exhibition layout. Which means set-up time is a lot longer than most other layouts!

Coupled to this is the fact I live so far away – from anywhere really – and this means a heavy commitment of time from my operating crew (ExpoNG for example is two days there and two days back!) and high expenses for the show organisers.

I am not saying ExpoNG will be ‘Rhyd’s’ last exhibition; just the last for a while.

I was discussing this conclusion with friends and one of them suggested putting a web-site together as a ‘virtual’ exhibition. So here it is: www.rhyd.weebly.com

Ralph’s Models

L&B Model Trackwork

I have prepared the following two track samples for display at the L&B World section within the Warley MRC exhibition at the NEC this month.

Original L&BR Track 1898 – c.1926


40lb/yard Rail in 30′ lengths
Fishplates 15½” x 2”
Sleepers 4’6” x 9” x 4½” (often waney edge)
Clips and bolts at joint sleepers, spikes inbetween

Karlgarin Code 82 Rail
KBscale fishplates
Coffee stirrer sleepers
Clips adapted from KBscale clips
Proto:87 Stores spikes

Main Line Track as relaid by S.R. c.1926


40lb/yard Rail in 30′ lengths (original reused)
Fishplates 15½” x 2” (original reused)
Sleepers 4’6” x 9 ½” x 4½” (new)
Baseplates, clips and bolts (new)

Karlgarin Code 82 Rail
KBscale fishplates
Limewood sleepers
KBscale L&B clips

The End of the Line O14

Giles Favell deservedly won the David LLoyd trophy at ExpoNG 2012 for his superb O14 (and standard gauge) layout The End of the Line.

A key feature of this layout is it’s operation:

Yes we know the skips derailed but I think we can let him off after that lorry driving!